Scholar Stage

Rebecca MackeyRebeca Mackey

Major:  Agriscience
Hometown:  Elizabethtown, Kentucky 
High school: Central Hardin High School

 

Activities and Organizations

Agribusiness Club, Agriculture Leadership Council and Sigma Alpha, the professional sorority for women in agriculture.

 

Q&A

 

What do you want to do after graduation?
I would love to work for an agricultural company as an event planner and coordinator. Or possibly become a lobbyist for an agricultural-based firm.

How do you define success?
Success is defined by people in many different ways. It is a personal feeling of accomplishment or achievement. I cannot define the success of another person, and I can only define my success once I have achieved it.

Can you provide a brief overview of your summer fellowship with Congressman Comer?
I was the pilot for the fellowship program between Congressman James Comer’s office and Murray State’s Hutson School of Agriculture. Over the summer, I was able to live and work in Washington, D.C., experiencing the city and learning what it was like to work in a congressional office. My responsibilities included working with constituents by answering phone calls, taking down concerns and sorting mail. I was also able to attend meetings of the House Committee on Agriculture and research information regarding the house bill that Congressman Comer filed before the August recess.

Why did you decide to attend Murray State?
Murray State was my only choice for higher education. I was able to meet faculty and staff from the University at the Kentucky FFA State Convention between my freshman and sophomore year of high school. From that moment on, I knew this was where I belonged.

What is something you’ve accomplished at Murray State that you’re most proud to have done?
As I entered my senior year, I thought about this specific question a lot. I want to leave a mark and make an impact on the things I am a part of while here at Murray State. An accomplishment isn’t necessarily something I can check off my to-do list or something I can touch. It is more of a sense of pride when I reflect on my time here at Murray State and the impact I had on my program, school, professors and fellow students.

What opportunities have you been afforded at Murray State?
My time here at Murray State will be shorter than some, as I’ll be receiving my undergraduate degree in only three years, but within those three years, I have been afforded opportunities that some people only dream of.

What do you think sets Murray State apart from other universities?
The sense of community and campus belonging. Without Murray State, I would not be the person I am today — from the friends I have made to the lessons I have learned both in and out of the classroom.

What advice would you give to incoming freshmen?
My number one piece of advice for freshmen is to get involved. College is 1,000,000% of what you make of it. You have to take advantage of opportunities afforded to you while you’re here at Murray State, because they’re almost all once-in-a-lifetime opportunities.